Frank Sinatra Jr. dead at 72: Legendary singer's son who was kidnapped and held for ransom in 1963 dies of a heart attack

Frank Sinatra Jr., who carried on his famous father’s legacy with his own music career, has died at the age of 72 from a suspected heart attack. He is pictured at a concert in Florida last week  
His family said he died unexpectedly while on tour in Florida
The singer was in Daytona Beach for a show, but was admitted to hospital
Just a short time later, he reportedly went into cardiac arrest
Sinatra Jr. followed his famed father into the music industry
He was famously kidnapped
and held for ransom in Lake Tahoe in 1963
His father also died of a heart attack, in 1998 when he was 82  

Frank Sinatra Jr., who carried on his famous father’s legacy with his own music career, has died at the age of 72.
His family said in a statement that Sinatra died unexpectedly Wednesday of a heart attack while on tour in Daytona Beach, Florida.
The statement said the family mourns the untimely passing of their son, brother, father and uncle. No other details were provided.
His world-famous father also died from a heart attack in 1998. He was 82.
Sinatra Jr. was kidnapped and held for ransom in Lake Tahoe in 1963, when he was just 19, and had already followed his dad into the music business by then. 
He eventually worked for his father as his musical director and conductor. 
He performed the National Anthem at a New York Yankees game last year.
According to TMZ he was in Daytona to do a show on Wednesday but died suddenly during the afternoon.
Initially, he only felt lightheaded but canceled the show.
The gossip site reported that he said he was feeling better but then went into cardiac arrest.
Grammy winner Steve Tyrell was one of the first people to pay tribute to Sinatra Jr, writing on Twitter: 'I am overwhelming (sic) saddened by the sudden passing of my dear friend Frank Sinatra Jr.'
For the past half century Frank Jr has toured the world as a singer; for the past two decades performing his father’s classic songbook in his show Sinatra Sings Sinatra. 
In an interview with the Mail on Sunday last year, he described what it was like living in the shadow of his father.
He said he had woefully few memories growing up of his father. He admitted much of what he learned came from the pages of books, fanzines and, more recently, computer searches.